'Canadianness' and Pride

Next year, Canada will be celebrating its 150th birthday and many brands will try to capitalize on the heightened feelings of national pride. Over the years our work has explored objects and images that evoke metaphors of identity and which give insight into ‘Canadianness’ relevant for brand building.

We have had people share stories of themselves through objects they selected as important to them. In one case it was a young man’s canoe paddle.  It helped him describe Canadianness.  The paddle spoke to his great love of the outdoors, the pristine lakes and rivers that he retreated to regularly to connect with the Canadian wilderness and himself.  His story revolved around the discovery of a great land, which he saw as synonymous with Mother Nature and her nurturing of his own hero journey of self discovery.  

This young man’s narrative, evoked by his paddle, is thematic and emerges time and again.  Nature, the expansive and pristine landscape of this country represents the value of ‘freedom’ that drives Canadian pride across demographic groups.  This country’s beautiful landscape represents physical, emotional and psychological freedom necessary for nurturing possibilities and potential. While the objects introduced differ from person to person:  a beautifully rendered Haida eagle tattoo, a river rock, a photograph of the Rocky Mountains, the shared value of freedom emerges and its manifestation as a source of pride.

It is because of this work using evocative objects and metaphoric imagery that we were not surprised by the findings of the latest Havas Prosumer Report. ‘Pride and Prejudice: Shifting Mindsets in an Age of Uncertainty’ suggests that Canada was one of the few countries where its values at 69% and not its history or culture, are the top drivers of pride. It is consistent with our exploration of ‘how customers think’ and reaffirms that values and their associated emotions are the unconscious drivers of behaviour.

In the best selling book, ‘Art as Therapy’, authors Alain de Botton and John Armstrong discuss the important role that objects play in communicating our identities to the world.  “We don’t just like art objects. We are also, in the case of certain prized examples, a bit like them. They are the media through which we come to know ourselves, and let others know more of what we are really about.“

Next we will explore objects and imagery that deal with ‘acceptance’, another Canadian value that drives pride.